Former Premier League referee Dermot Gallagher has assessed whether Diogo Jota’s goal that put Liverpool level against Newcastle at Anfield on Wednesday should have held…

Isaac Hayden drove through Jonjo Shelvey’s early shot, hitting Jamal Lascelles and was on the ground in the six-yard area when Jota followed his header to score.

Newcastle manager Eddie Howe felt referee Mike Dean’s decision not to stop playing due to a head injury was the defining moment of the match as Liverpool drew before winning 3-1.

But former referee Gallagher believes Dean was in no position to reverse his decision on the field to allow the goal to stand after not realizing the nature of Hayden’s injury in preparations…

What did Hao say about Jota’s goal?

“We didn’t do everything right, that’s obvious,” Howe said, “but we certainly didn’t have any luck either.”

“The turning point of the game is an obvious one, I can’t understand how Mike didn’t stop the match. It’s clear that Isaac immediately holds his head in our six-yard box with another player and that leads to the goal.

“At that time it was clear to me that the match had to stop and it wasn’t. This is the defining moment of the match.

“I couldn’t believe what I was seeing. The priority always has to be player safety, we talk a lot at the moment about head injuries and I felt like this was a wrong decision and we were treated very harshly today.

“He was tackled and went out to the side and didn’t show himself 100 per cent. It follows a similar pattern where the green turned against us.”

“The VAR can’t intervene because there was no insult”

Diogo Jota scored on the second attempt
picture:
Diogo Jota scored on the second attempt

Dermot’s rule: The right decision to award the goal.

Dermot says: “It’s interesting because Mike Dean is completely unaware. That’s the main issue and because it’s happening so fast, he’s actually unaware. The ball goes into the penalty area and when it is cleared, Hayden goes to the ground and it happens so quickly the ball goes back inside, Jota put The ball is in the net and at this point Mike realizes that Hayden has fallen.

“It is very close to [David] Jia incident [during Manchester United’s 3-2 win over Arsenal this month]. In this case, if he is fouled by his unique player and the referee is not aware of it either.

Please use Chrome browser for an accessible video player

Newcastle coach Eddie Howe described Diogo Jota’s equalizer for Liverpool, Thursday, as unfair, as Isaac Hayden was injured in the match.

“The unfortunate thing is that VAR technology has a process of looking at every target and all they can check is if there was a foul, and it’s pretty clear there was no offense. The only thing is that there was a head injury but Mike didn’t see Dean and so couldn’t Act on it and VAR can no longer interfere.

“Unfortunately for Newcastle, it is a valid target.”

But the Newcastle players raised their heads in an attempt to make Mike Dean realize they had a player with his head on the floor? Should they just play with the whistle?

Dermot says: “You should play with a whistle. It’s okay to raise your hands but it happened so quickly and it’s fair to Mike Dean, he wasn’t aware of it. If he knew, there’s absolutely no doubt it would blow up because player safety is paramount.

“The umpires are very attentive to that and very quick to stop play due to head injuries but unfortunately. It didn’t happen this time because of the speed of the move. We are talking about the accident because of the score. If the header had sailed over the pub, all the talk would have been gone.”

But doesn’t Dean look back three times to check on Hayden?

Newcastle players respond after Liverpool's goal
picture:
Newcastle players respond after Liverpool’s goal

Former Manchester City defender Nedum Onoha told Sky Sports:

“I feel like this game is a little different than De Gea because the ball has been in play since the moment Hayden fell a little bit longer. And as you can see in the replay you can see him peeking and I think his standards referee should be able to see that.

“Maybe there was intentional blindness but it was there. It wasn’t just a split second and he let it go on. So if he missed it, I personally think that’s all wrong with him.

“On the other hand, if he watches it and feels like there’s nothing serious, that’s another very important issue. And the truth is I think there’s enough time to watch it and when you look at the video, whether you like it or not, it’s a semi-criminal because he peeks a few times .

“On the topic of playing with the whistle, the truth is that both groups of players did that. Jota was playing on it because he knew he was along with the players on the ground as well, so something happened.

“The assistant referee sees it where he can see the players on the ground are playing Jota on the other side. So if they miss it, they can do better and if they ignore it, they can do better.”

Should Newcastle have received a penalty?

Please use Chrome browser for an accessible video player

Watch for free: Highlights from Liverpool’s victory over Newcastle

With the match balanced 2-1, Newcastle felt they should have taken a penalty when Trent Alexander-Arnold appeared to pass through the back of Ryan Fraser taking some of the ball while inside the penalty area.

The incident came under increased scrutiny as it occurred 24 hours after Vladimir Koval was sent off as Arsenal awarded a penalty in their 2-0 win over West Ham, despite the full-back winning some ball in the Alexandre Lacazette challenge. .

Dermot’s rule: The right decision not to sentence the penalty.

Newcastle were unhappy with Mike Dean's Thursday night refereeing at Liverpool
picture:
Newcastle were unhappy with Mike Dean’s refereeing

Dermot says: “It’s a really tough call. You look at it over and over. Different people have different opinions. The referee can’t be sure it’s a penalty, so it gives the defender the edge of doubt as he has to in law.

“He was going to discuss it with the VAR, but due to the tightness of the matter, they can’t overturn it because there was no clear and obvious foul. They can’t re-articulate the match, so they have to follow the original decision. Based on the evidence he got, he can’t. Submit a penalty.

“He can only go to the screen if the VAR feels he has made a clear and obvious mistake. The VAR can’t say he made a mistake, so if you send him to the monitor for that, you ask him to return the referee. The game that is not part of the game. of the protocol.

“Play should have stopped – player removed”

Headway, the brain injury charity, has stressed the importance of stopping football matches when a head injury occurs, after a controversial goal scored in Thursday night’s match between Liverpool and Newcastle.

“Recent injuries to players like Ryan Mason and Raul Jimenez show how important it is for head injuries to be taken seriously in the sport,” said Peter McCabe, Chief Executive of Headway.

“Without immediate specialized medical intervention, the outcomes in both cases could have been much more dire.

“Referees will always be under more pressure at potential goals-scoring moments to allow play to continue, but players’ health and safety must be the first and only priority.”

The charity also questioned why the Newcastle defender was allowed to continue after manager Eddie Howe said he had been dizzy for four or five minutes as a result of the collision.

“The concussion protocols are quite clear. If a player is suspected of having suffered a concussion, they should be removed from the field of play and not allowed to return.

“Being in a stupor is a sign that something is not right and a concussion may have occurred. In such cases, the correct thing from a player welfare point of view is for Isaac Hayden to be replaced using the concussion substitution rule.

“If the temporary concussion rule that Headway has long advocated was an option, the player would have been easily evaluated for a longer period. The fact that he got dizzy after the match is concerning.

“In the end, we’re left once again saying ‘the lessons must be learned’ when it comes to concussion in football.”

Source link

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.